151 men left, 7 would never come back | SkyHiNews.com
Donald Dailey
For Sky-Hi News

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151 men left, 7 would never come back

One-hundred-and-fifty-one men, ranging in age from 21 to 31, lined up in Hot Sulphur Springs on June 5, 1917, drafted into service for WWI. They would go on to become soldiers in the U.S. Army, sailors in the Navy and members of the Marine Corps.

Seven would never return to home soil.

In early September, just before the boys would head out, as the final farewells were heard, the towns of Hot Sulphur Springs and Kremmling hosted large farewell parties for the draftees. All towns had their American Red Cross chapters conduct fund drives. Letters were written and comfort kits of afghans, sweaters, socks and more were given to the service members.

The first contingent of Army troops departed Hot Sulphur Springs for Camp Funston, Kan., by passenger train on Sept. 17. The second contingent left on Oct. 2.

Seven of these soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice, three as combatants. Private First Class Charles "Tex" Heines of Parshall, Private Fred L. Perry of Hot Sulphur Springs and Private George L. Lawson of the Williams Fork.

There were four non-combatants who passed away from pneumonia, three of which were Camp Funston, including Private Adolph S. Brown of Scholl, Corporal Guy L. Ish of Grand Lake's Rapids Lodge, Private Carter B. Yust of Kremmling and Private First Class Alex Klein of Tabernash.

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The 144 surviving soldiers, sailors, and marines, were awarded the Grand County Honor Medal on Sept. 26, 1919 at the Middle Park Fair & Rodeo in Kremmling.