Grand County, Denver Water implement agreement, additional water available for rivers through Grand County | SkyHiNews.com

Grand County, Denver Water implement agreement, additional water available for rivers through Grand County

Sky-Hi News Staff Report

A major milestone in implementing the Colorado River Cooperative Agreement was reached last week when the water court signed a decree to secure and preserve environmental water flows in the Fraser, Williams Fork and Colorado rivers. The decree protects releases of 2,000 acre-feet of water made available from Denver Water's Moffat Collection System and Williams Fork Reservoir to preserve and improve the aquatic environment in the Fraser and Colorado rivers all the way through Grand County — a continuous stream reach of 73 miles — and beyond.

"This is truly a unique transbasin collaborative and milestone that provides the additional environmental flows on the Fraser River as contemplated by the CRCA," said Grand County Board of County Commissioners Chairman Jane Tollett.

Once the Gross Reservoir Expansion Project is complete, Denver Water will be able to provide more water for county streams by delivering water to the Fraser River Basin at diversion points along its system, and by releasing water from Williams Fork Reservoir to the Colorado River.

The decree also provides for the delivery of 375 acre-feet to a number of Grand County water users for municipal and snowmaking purposes. If the water is not needed for those purposes, it can be added to the water being provided for environmental benefit.

“This is truly a unique transbasin collaborative and milestone that provides the additional environmental flows on the Fraser River as contemplated by the CRCA.” Grand County Board of County Commissioners Chairman Jane Tollett.

The decree represents the most recent success in meeting the agreements outlined in the CRCA.

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"In only a few short years since the CRCA went into effect, we're already seeing that through collaboration, we can help improve the health of the Fraser and Colorado rivers," said Jim Lochhead, Denver Water CEO/manager. "This decree is another step in ensuring that we are prepared to fully implement the CRCA conditions as they become effective."

In 2014, Denver Water made a payment of $1.95 million to Grand County for two water supply projects. The Jim Creek Bypass and Pipeline, which Winter Park Water and Sanitation District is already designing, will help protect water quality at its water treatment plant in low-flow periods, and provide system flexibility. And, the Fraser River Pump Station, Pipeline and Discovery Park Pond project, pays for much-needed improvements that will help stabilize the business of Winter Park Resort and other businesses in the upper Fraser Valley.

The Colorado Water Conservation Board will use the delivered water to preserve and improve the natural environment through its Instream Flow Program.

"The CWCB is extremely pleased to be able to work with Grand County and Denver Water to implement this important agreement," said James Eklund, director of the Colorado Water Conservation Board. "This is a great example of how effective the state's Instream Flow Program can be in the context of multipurpose projects."

The CRCA ushers in a new era of cooperation between Denver Water, West Slope entities and conservation groups to create a spirit of cooperation instead of litigation over water resources through "Learning By Doing," a monitoring and adaptive management program with the goal of maintaining, and where possible, improving the health of Colorado River headwater streams in Grand County.

"Thanks to the Learning by Doing framework, we're finding ways to maintain healthy flows for fish and wildlife in the Upper Colorado," said Mely Whiting, counsel for Trout Unlimited. "We're learning — by doing — that collaboration and cooperation can help ensure the health of our rivers while meeting other diverse needs, like municipal water. These flows will make a real difference for the river and for Grand County's important recreation economy."

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