Life-long learning in the beauty business | SkyHiNews.com

Life-long learning in the beauty business

Ilizabeth Adelman is the owner/stylist of Ilizabeth's Beauty Movement, a studio in Fraser. Last week she traveled to Hollywood to take a class in Airbrush Makeup.

"I've been doing Airbrush Makeup for four years," she said while finishing a hair service in her Fraser studio on Wednesday afternoon.

"But just foundation."

The classes she took in California now give her the skills to do advanced makeup application which can lead her in several different directions such as makeovers and image consulting.

With Airbrush Makeup stylists can cover flaws and cover birthmarks. The foundation lasts up to 18 hours, she said. With this technique a tearful bride can avoid unsightly mascara streaks.

Adelman has been in the beauty business for 37 years.

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"I have to keep educating myself with modern techniques. I've been wanting to take this class for so long."

The last few years she has been moving into the direction of just doing bridal hair and makeup services.

Now, after years of doing everything in the beauty industry she is now focusing solely on weddings, which no one else in the valley is doing.

"Painting someone's face is like painting a picture," she said. And after six years of art school she now sees instant gratification while working on her clients.

"I see how incredible it looks right away."

She works with other local businesses such as Rami Carter, who owns Pick Me Weddings, and Cindy Thompson, in Winter Park who also does hair and makeup services.

She will refer clients to A La Mode in Granby for nails.

"We all work together to refer business."

Katelynn Starks, 19, of Granby had her hair and makeup done on Wednesday afternoon by Adelman.

"To me this is creating not just cutting," said Adelman.

"It's a work of art. I put in braids, curls and little twisty things."

"I love her style," said Starks.

"She's got a different style from everyone in Grand County. She is more modern and easy going. It's not poufy or dramatic."

This was the first time Starks had her make up done.

"I'm not used to someone being so close to my face," Starks said with a laugh.

"But I look better with makeup. It's not over-dramatic or caked; you can even tell I have foundation on. It's more natural."

Adelman likes to think of her style as more romantic and less prom-like.

Hair is like creating a sculpture and a face is like painting a picture or portrait.

Beauty Business

Adelman works in a studio at her home in Fraser. She admits that the beauty business can be a bit cutthroat but feels strongly that if a client is meant to go to her, they will come.

"There are so many people around. I don't see the competition," she said.

"As I get older I know I'm going to have clients and a thriving busines; I've been doing it for so long."

Stylists that are new to the business are more afraid, she said.

Adelman enjoys working for herself and working closely with other wedding venue businesses.

"Many of them are older and have been doing this for a long time."

Adelman learned the business in the 80s when she worked for Matrix Essentials, which is now owned by L'Oreal.

"I was an educational consultant and they taught hairstylists color and perms, and business owners how to generate more business."

She was fortunate to learn a lot and take management skill classes.

"You have to know your bottom line and you have to spend money to make money," she said.

"It's an old saying, and still true to this day. I've been lucky to work with really talented people."

While living in California she met a lot of people who were in upper management in the industry and they were willing to share.

"When you get to a certain point in your career you want to share what you know."

Adelman spends about 20 hours a week on marketing and social media. Her business is showing up on Google.

"It's been hard, continual work."

She works with bridal companies such as The Knot and big bridal companies in Denver. She travels throughout the state and business this summer is looking strong.

advice

With Adelman's longevity in the industry her advice to anyone looking to get into the beauty industry is to do your homework.

"Look at what is needed. You may have a great idea but there is no need," she said.

"Do your homework. With the lack of year-round business [in Grand County], you have to have a special niche. This wedding business, no one is just doing it exclusively. They rather do their own clients and I would rather do weddings."

While women in the beauty industry seemingly don't get along, Adelman wishes they would all come together as a team.

"There are enough clients for everybody to make enough money."

Adelman can be reached through her website: Ilizabethsbeautymovement.com.

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