Fraser Rec elections result in tie for second seat | SkyHiNews.com

Fraser Rec elections result in tie for second seat

Katie Looby
Sky-Hi Daily News

An election tie has occurred for the first time in Fraser Valley Metropolitan Recreation District history, says Recreation Supervisor Michelle Lawrence.

Newcomer Greg Gallavan won a seat on the board with 335 votes, while election judges counted 213 votes for both Kevin Davlin and John Kacik for the other open seat.

The unofficial vote was tallied just past midnight on Tuesday. The district will canvas the election.

Lawrence plans to contact Davlin and Kacik to find out what kind of “lotto drawing” they want to use to decide who is awarded the seat. They could flip a coin, roll dice or pick the short end of a straw, she said.

She is not sure if they have the right to request a recount because it was an exact tie.

“The judges feel very, very confident on the counting,” she said.

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Former Board President Jim Fox had 102 votes; Former Vice President Howard Venezia had 92; Traci Brammer had 90; Terry Stanford had 36; and Jill Carey had 15.

Gallavan is a business owner who has lived in Grand County for 32 years. Since the bond issue was approved, he has been attending every meeting, he said.

The campaign platform that helped Gallavan win the election was: “We’ll build those projects, we won’t go over budget and we won’t be coming back to the taxpayers for more money.”

After he heard the results he said he felt “real good.”

“It’s a big challenge now,” he said. “We’re going to have a couple new board members and we’re going to make things happen.”

The board is responsible for $21.15 million worth of projects and improvements to the area. This includes: a $14.88 million recreation center, $3.07 million clubhouse at Pole Creek, 1.64 million irrigation project at Pole Creek, the $432,674 sports complex and the $1.12 million water and sanitation project at the sports complex.

Gallavan said he plans to become more involved in the district projects. He wants to help decide if the board will fill the executive director position.

“There’s a lot of things that are kind of in the air,” he said. “We just need to do the investigation and see where that leads.”

He and Davlin sent a letter to all the registered district voters so they knew when the election was happening, and a form so they could request absentee ballots.

Lawrence said she sent 309 absentee ballots out, but did not count how many were returned.

“We just informed them,” Gallavan said. “We both put out information there, so they knew more about us than anybody else.”

However, he and Davlin have their own views, he said.

Gallavan probably scored the most votes because he is fiscally responsible and known in the district, he said. In addition, he said the community is ready for a change.

Kacik, has lived in Grand County for 16 years and is a stay-at-home parent and former electrician.

“I feel that I ran the best campaign I could,” he said.

He e-mailed residents will children in the district and friends a letter about the election and his views. He also displayed fliers around town to “get the word out.”

He said he was not surprised by the results.

“I think the three people who took the top three spots were the only ones that did any campaigning at all,” he said. “In a small town like that you have to get the word out.

“Right now I’m waiting to hear what’s going to happen. Statistically, it’s amazing that that can happen.”

Davlin is an attorney with Livingstone, Mueller, O’Brien and Davlin, P.C. who has lived in Grand County for 22 years. The Sky-Hi Daily News could not be reach him because he was traveling abroad.

“The Rec District should be ran like a privately owned business such as (every) dollar counts as if it was your own coming out of ‘your own wallet’ and not spent as if it is ‘taxpayers dollars and who cares, it is not my money,’ he has said in a forum.

Methods to settle an election tie vary, said Richard Coolidge, spokesman for the Colorado Secretary of State’s office, which does not have jurisdiction over the district.

Susanna Lienhard with the Department of Local Affairs said state statute says a tied election is decided by a lot drawing: “Some sort of a drawing by straws or coin toss.”

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