Granby approves OHV ordinance | SkyHiNews.com

Granby approves OHV ordinance

Check your blind spots when driving in Granby this summer.

The Town of Granby's Board of Trustees approved an ordinance last week, Tuesday May 10, to allow for the operation of off-highway-vehicles (OHVs) on most of the Town's streets. The ordinance comes after several weeks of Board discussion and debate along with several amended ordinance proposals as the Board worked out the details of how such an ordinance would be administered.

The final ordinance approved by the Board allows OHVs to operate on all of Granby's town streets excepting North 1st Street from East Diamond Avenue to East Jasper Avenue and on North 4th Street from East Garnet Avenue to East Jasper Avenue. The ordinance also restricts the use of OHVs on several streets surrounding Granby's local schools at specific times of day.

During school days OHVs are prohibited from operating on Laplata Drive, East Diamond Avenue west of North 2nd Avenue, West Diamond Avenue, West Diamond Court and East Diamond Court between the hours of 7:45 a.m. and 8 a.m. and between 3:45 p.m. and 4:10 p.m. Anyone operating an OHV on Granby's streets is required to hold a valid driver's license and be at least 21-years old.

The ordinance does not allow for the use of OHVs on Avenues A B or C. Avenues A B and C lie entirely within Granby proper but are technically a part of unincorporated Grand County, having never been formally annexed by the Town. Grand County does not allow OHVs to operate on those roads.

The ordinance also specifies that snowmobiles, golf carts, military vehicles and vehicles designed for travel on water are not allowed under the ordinance. Any OHVs that operate on town streets must have at least one lighted headlamp and one lighted taillight along with side and rear reflectors and a rearview mirror.

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The work to pass the ordinance was initiated by former Granby Town Trustee Charlie LaBrake, who passed away at the beginning of this year. In March his wife, Janet LaBrake formally approached the Town Board requesting the passage of an ordinance allowing the use of all-terrain-vehicles (ATVs) and OHVs on streets in Granby. LaBrake explained her desire to allow OHVs on Granby streets stems from the plowing work she does during winter months.

LaBrake uses a four-wheeler for her plowing operations and asked the Town to pass an ordinance that would allow her to move from one plowing location to another on her four-wheeler without being required to load or unload the vehicle onto larger trucks or trailers.

The issue first came before the Board of Trustees in March and was visited again in mid-April when a draft ordinance was presented. The initial ordinance allowed OHVs on multiple town streets and restricted use to individuals 16 and older. Following Board discussions Granby Town staff redrafted the ordinance.

In late April a newly elected Board of Trustees considered the issue once again. The draft presented in late April outlined which streets OHVs would not be allowed on in Granby, allowing OHVs to operate on any town street not specifically prohibited. After Board members raised additional questions during the meeting the ordinance was tabled for the following Board meeting.

The vote in early May approving the ordinance was contested with two opposing votes and three votes in support. Granby Mayor Paul Chavoustie, Mayor Pro-Tem Deb Shaw and Trustee Robin Trainor all voted in favor of the measure while Trustees Becky Johnson and Jane Harmon voted against. Trustees Greg Mordini and Paul Robertson were not present for the vote.

Granby Town Manager Wally Baird said the Town plans on adding signage at specific locations in the community including near Middle Park High School and at both entrances to town.

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