Granby mayor says thanks for everything | SkyHiNews.com

Granby mayor says thanks for everything

With the election only one day away and while I am still serving your as mayor, let me say thank you. Thank you for all of it: the late night meetings, the early morning phone calls, the hours spent poring over complicated agreements and prepping for those meetings, and the hard work put forth by so many to accomplish so much.

It has been an experience like being in a very large, extended family. While I didn’t always enjoy some of the behaviors of some family members (and they probably didn’t always enjoy me either), they were always family.

As my family did while I grew up, we’ve had some lively discussions around the dinner table. There were times of rejoicing: such as a marriage or the uniting of the dreams of the “new” members of Granby with “the old timers,” when lands were annexed into town.

There were challenges: when arguments between siblings spoiled dessert or when there were conflicts between desires and regulations.

There was tragedy: when an accident took away loved ones and when rage overcame reason and resulted in destruction.

There was celebration: at the birth of new life and successful rebuilding after disaster.

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There was hard day-to-day work: mom and dad doing everything they could to insure a prosperous future for the kids and keeping an eye on the vision for the town while paying attention not to trip over the picky details along the way. Hard work was taught as a virtue, and there’s no substitute for it in the kitchen, on the job, or in the board room. It never fails to amaze how much time is involved.

As in many families, there have been misunderstandings. There have been simple disagreements and more complicated ones as well. At times, the kids have misbehaved.

There have been times when someone at the table has slapped their knife and fork down in frustration and anger, perhaps flinging a bit of mashed potatoes across to land on Uncle’s shirt. Some family members have held grudges for years and haven’t come to share in the repast.

Some have whispered in the dark, even shouted from the rooftops, nastiness and falsehood trying to spoil dinner for everyone.

Sadly, there even have been family members who forgot Grace and sought to deflect blame for their own transgressions onto others.

There are many challenges before our growing family, and how we embrace each other and work toward solving those challenges is as important as the results. At the table before us are many dishes from which to choose. Some dishes won’t be to everyone’s taste; some at the table will have allergies to a dish or two. There will be plenty of choices, however, so everyone should find something to satisfy them.

This election season has seen an ample supply of sourness, vinegar, and bile. Too much so. Instead of a family discussion around the table, accusations and distortions have predominated; cause enough for a case of indigestion.

Good friends have said, “Why do you want to keep going through this?” The reasons are fairly simple, I guess.

Granby and Grand County is my home, and the people I serve with and for ARE a family, of sorts. I have no agenda, other than to heap the dinner table with as many tasty delights as possible and to pay attention to the ingredients in each dish to make the meal as wholesome and appetizing as possible.

Despite what some would have you believe, I’m always eager to swap recipes and try new dishes. I can’t promise to always like them as much as you do, but I’m willing to give them a taste.

Knowledge, experience, the right ingredients, and vision make a good cook and a good mayor. No one can guarantee that a big meal will have every dish relished by every guest, but a good cook will guarantee to keep on working on the menu to satisfy as many as possible.

Once again, thank you for allowing me to serve you at this banquet. I’d love to keep on cooking and serving you for another four years. I’ve been working on a great dessert, too.

Mayor Ted Wang

Granby

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