Grand County … Turn Back the Pages | SkyHiNews.com

Grand County … Turn Back the Pages

by Cyndi Palmer
Sky-Hi Daily News

Five years ago, the Grand County Board of County Commissioners approved permits which paved the way for major improvements and expansion at Devil’s Thumb Ranch. One aspect of the permit called for a 33,983-gallon-per-day sand filter waste water treatment system.

– The Granby Board of Trustees OK’d extensive changes, additions and deletions to the town’s zoning, planning and subdivision code. A “re-codification” had been in the works at the town hall for more than three years. It was designed to clean up inconsistencies, awkward language and out-dated laws.

– Portions of Millers Idlewild Inn in Hideaway Park was converted into affordable housing through a project of the Grand County Housing Authority. The Inn was built in 1946 and was sold by the family in 1974.

– Tonya Townsend was selected to participate in the Nationals’ Miss Jr. Teen Denver pageant. Angelo Cappello retired after almost 24 years in the cabinetry business.

Rocky Mountain National Park named Jim Sanborn as its new west side ranger.

Construction would begin in the spring for a new local Liberty Savings Bank office.

Recommended Stories For You

And, the Grand Lake Metro. Rec. District picked Janice Peck for its new golf course maintenance foreman position.

Ten years ago, members of the Shadow Mountain Lake Association and eight governmental entities discussed plans to bring an end to a problem on the North Fork of the Colorado River, near the Pine Beach picnic area. The problem involved a fill-in resulting from sediment coming down-river and being deposited in the lake.

– After more than a year without an employment office, Granby Job Service opened its doors at the old Emergency Medical Service building. Grand County had another job service office in hot Sulphur Springs, but the Colorado Department of Labor closed it in November 1996 as part of a cost-saving measure.

– No adverse comments were heard during a public hearing in Grand Lake concerning a new preschool building for the town. The hearing was held as a requirement for obtaining a $100,000 block grant from a federal Community Development program to subsidize the modular unit (to be used as a preschool and day care center).

– Donnie and Jodie Kern announced the birth of son Damien. Phyllis Carmichael retired from the U.S. Forest Service after 11 years with the Sulphur Ranger District. The SilverCreek Inn had a new pool deck. The Lariat celebrated its 18th birthday.

“Roni Roo” Eden earned an art degree. A Maryland man died after choking while dining at a Winter Park restaurant. And, the old Phillips 66 sign, a vestige of the days before the Eisenhower Tunnel when gas stations were common along U.S. Highway 40, was removed by Sky Crane.

Twenty-five years ago, the Grand County Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution to file for additional water rights to support a Gore Canyon hydroelectric component to the proposed Wolford Mountain Reservoir project. A pumping plant at the small reservoir could send water to the power plant or up to storage.

– The search for a German cross-country skier in Rocky Mountain National Park ended. The National Park Service announced its West Unit personnel would be keeping an eye on the area in where they thought he might have been buried in an avalanche.

– A National Weather Service weather station was being proposed at YMCA of the Rockies, Snow Mountain Ranch. When operational, it would be the first station in the county since 1975, when it was at the YMCA. Before that and for 23 years Fraser had a station.

– Granby’s El Grand Theatre proprietor Jim Krankota wanted people to know his upcoming movie “Hardcore” was “recommended viewing” for teenagers with their parents. He said the film prompted objections from some but noted the educational quality. The film revealed the negative aspects of the porno industry.

– Cliff Kimble, Tom Kircher and Rick Markwardt were members of the Spirit Haus dart team. The West Wind Whirlers square dance club was hosting twice-monthly dances.

Three people wanted on Grand County warrants were arrested in other states. And, Summit County doctors blamed travel time and the poor condition of U.S. Highway 9 as major factors hindering getting patients to Kremmling Memorial Hospital.

Fifty years ago, electors in the proposed Kremmling Sanitation District would go to the polls April 1 to vote for actual formation of the district. A note was made that the vote did not include construction of the sanitation system, only the formation of the district. They would also vote for a five-member board of directors.

– Veterans Administration announced a new pilot study underway to review veterans’ claims that were disallowed after World War II. The study was requested because some veterans’ organizations believed VA may have erred in disallowing some of the claims.

– The annual report of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad showed 1957 total gross revenues of $85,236,093, an increase of $3,880,977 over 1956. Net income for 1957 was $12,912,771, the highest in the history of the company.

– Governor McNichols released a report of the Colorado Department of Highways showing the allocation of money from the Highway Users Tax Fund to individual counties. The report disclosed that total funds received by the counties were 27 percent greater in 1957 than in 1954.

– The Rev. E.T. Bollinger of Elizabeth was recalled to serve the Parish of the Eternal Hills. The Middle Park Cowbelles were sponsoring an “Entertaining with Beef” contest. And, local sportsmen’s clubs, civic organizations and youth groups made plans for the observance of National Wildlife Week March 16-22 (Walt Disney was the year’s national honorary chairman).

Go back to article