Hot Sulphur Springs hires John Stein as town marshal | SkyHiNews.com

Hot Sulphur Springs hires John Stein as town marshal

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HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS — There's a new marshal in the town where the new sheriff works.

John Stein, former Grand County undersheriff and candidate for sheriff in last year's election, was approved for the new position of town marshal by the Hot Sulphur Springs Board of Trustees on Thursday night, March 19.

Hot Sulphur Springs Mayor Robert McVay said Friday the town has been considering adding the position for the past several months. He said the town originally wanted to create a code enforcement officer's position but decided instead to create the marshal's position because marshals have law enforcement authority and can issue summonses and conduct similar activities, which code enforcement officers cannot do.

Previously law enforcement responsibilities for Hot Sulphur Springs have fallen on the Grand County Sheriff's Office (GCSO). According to McVay, there is no formal agreement between the GCSO, and the Town and Hot Sulphur Springs paid no fee to the GCSO for overseeing law enforcement within the community.

When asked why the Town felt it was necessary to hire a Town Marshall with the GCSO located within their community McVay responded, "The Sheriff's Department does a fine job in town but they don't really have the manpower or the time to follow up on some of the things we want taken care of."

McVay said he hopes to have Marshal Stein begin his official duties for the town in early April, though no specific date has been finalized. The Town has not yet set a salary for the position.

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McVay said the Hot Sulphur Springs town marshal will have his own patrol vehicle for conducting his official duties.

Stein was unavailable for comment Friday morning.

Stein left his previous position with the sheriff's department in January after new Grand County Sheriff Brett Schroetlin took office. Stein ran a write-in campaign for the sheriff's position in a highly contested election last fall against Schroetlin.

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