Indian Peaks Charter School doesn’t deserve taxpayer support | SkyHiNews.com

Indian Peaks Charter School doesn’t deserve taxpayer support

To the Editor:

I’m writing in opposition to any further public funding for Indian Peaks Charter School.

Charter schools are public in name only. They are really private schools that are financed by tax dollars. They have little accountability and, as I understand it, the teachers don’t even have to be certified.

Charter schools were conceived out of an ideology that distrusts or, more accurately, despises public schools. Charter schools were a way for people with this mind-set to chip away at the foundation of our traditional public schools.

East Grand School District has excellent public schools. These schools have dedicated teachers, support staff and administrators. These schools meet a diversity student needs ” i.e. social, emotional, academic, behavioral and physical.

They do a commendable job with limited resources, and taking $500,000 out of the system will make their job all the more difficult. Roughly 96 percent (approximately 1,500) students in the EGSD attend these traditional public schools. Only 30 to 40 students (about 2 percent) attend IPCS.

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If the parents of these 30 to 40 kids don’t think that our traditional schools adequately cover the needs they require, then I believe they should consider the following options: They can home school their kids, they can send their kids to the Christian school in Tabernash, or they can start their own private school.

But I don’t believe we as taxpayers should pay for a ” do your own thing” school. If they want to opt out of our traditional schools and do their own thing, they should have the independence, courage, and character to fund their own effort as the Christian school does. They should no longer be subsidized by taxpayers who overwhelmingly support our traditional public schools as the enrollment numbers indicate.

I respectfully request that the board consider revoking the IPCS charter and then close the school at the end of the school year in June of 2008.

Glenn Bakken

Granby

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