Jackie Wright: Get Ready for Ski Season | SkyHiNews.com

Jackie Wright: Get Ready for Ski Season

Jackie Wright / The Fitness Trail
Grand County, CO Colorado

Second in a four-part series

Last week we discussed the Nordic/alpine physical fitness preparation tips with the number one tip being to get fit first. For the next three weeks, we will outline a skiing-preparation exercise program with this week dedicated to aerobic/steady state training and aerobic interval training.

As always, prior to beginning any exercise program, please consult your physician.

Aerobic/Steady State Training Program

This program will include aerobic/steady state training and aerobic interval training (i.e. sustainable aerobic power). Prior to beginning anaerobic interval training, you need to develop a solid aerobic/steady state foundation. Then, you can build that base to develop your anaerobic interval training, both of which are needed for alpine and Nordic skiing.

Aerobic/Steady State Training

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• Choose three to five days a week to dedicate to developing your aerobic base (i.e. M/W/F for three-day program or M/W/Th/F/Sat. or Sun. for a five-day program).

• Begin all training with a thorough, general body warm up for 5-10 minutes elevating your heart rate to 65 percent of your heart rate maximum or a 1-2 on the RPE scale which is a very light to light exertion level.

• Depending upon your current level of physical fitness, begin with 20-30 minutes of continuous aerobic work such as walking, running, cycling, swimming or hiking.

• You should be able to say your name and phone number the entire time but not carry on a continuous conversation.

• Increase the duration of your aerobic work gradually over a period of several weeks until you have achieved 30-60 minutes of continuous aerobic work during most sessions.

• Once this has been achieved, you are probably ready to begin your aerobic interval training.

Aerobic Interval Training

Aerobic interval training involves intervals of moderate intensity aerobic work followed by heavy intensity aerobic work focusing upon sustainable aerobic power. While power is often associated just with anaerobic work, sustaining a high level of performance and remaining aerobic is essential for any endurance oriented activity. The greater the level of intensity sustained, for greater periods of duration, the more effective you will generally be throughout performance of your activity.

-Begin by interspersing 30-second higher intensity exertion intervals into your program once or twice a week. For example, if you are running for 45 minutes steady state, begin to include several 30-second higher intensity intervals by picking up your pace during the run or adding hills, etc. The key is to sit on the edge right before you would become winded and then return to your steady state/recovery pace (i.e. 5 minutes of running at your regular steady state/recovery pace followed by 30-seconds of a higher intensity/greater exertion pace, six or seven times during the 45 minutes).

• There are virtually hundreds of ways to vary interval training. The shorter the duration of the recovery interval or the longer the exertion interval, the more challenging the training becomes.

• Once you have easily mastered this approach, then it may be time to begin anaerobic interval training.

Next week, we will feature an anaerobic interval training program to help you prepare for ski season.

Jackie Wright is the owner/manager of Never Summer Fitness, LLC located in Grand Lake, Colorado. She can be reached at her website at http://www.neversummerfitness.com, her email at NSFGL@comcast.net and her blog at http://www.skyhidailynews.com

– Editor’s note: The wrong Fitness Trail column ran by mistake last week. This is the column that was supposed to run last Friday.

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