Wright: Fitness as a value proposition | SkyHiNews.com

Wright: Fitness as a value proposition

Jackie Wright
Fitness Trail

What is a value proposition?

While there are various definitions, the one that fits this discussion is "a promise of a "value" to be delivered". In a nutshell, it is why we buy. When applied to fitness, the question to you is whether fitness is a value proposition. Does it provide enough value to you so that you "buy" for life?

If you "buy" fitness, whether through an actual purchase of a membership, personal training, exercise DVD, exercise equipment, specific exercise program you perform on your own or some combination of all of the above, is this purchase valuable and is it valuable enough that you will consistently commit? When asking yourself these questions, recall those instances when you bought and the value did not materialize. Were you able to reveal the reason why the value was not forthcoming?

The reality is that fitness is a life-changing value proposition. Fitness provides general health benefits as well as the ability to enjoy a full and abundant physical life whether that means you are running marathons or just enjoying a walk with your dog. Without adequate health and fitness levels, our bodies, which are movement machines, will begin to lose movement ability which we must fervently strive to avoid.

Therefore, determine your value proposition for fitness by checking out the following steps and create a fitness value proposition for today, tomorrow and beyond. As always, prior to beginning any exercise program, please consult your physician.

Place the greatest value on your health. This value should be a ten out of ten on a scale of one to ten. Making health a priority will enable you to properly prioritize the rest of your life. *Is it time for a physical?

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If you would like to experience authentic fitness in your life, then place a value on obtaining and maintaining a solid fitness level. While health propositions take priority, fitness places a close second and works in conjunction with obtaining and maintaining physiological and structural health.

Once you have your health/fitness value proposition in place, plot your course. Keep in mind that each part of the journey should possess a specific value proposition. For example, you would like to lose 20lbs. What is the value of this proposition? Attach a value to the 20lb. weight loss.

Applying a "T-close" approach works well with defining a value proposition. Place the "pros" on one side of the paper and the "cons" on the other drawing a "T" between the sides. Consider, and list all of the pros and cons that accompany a 20lb. weight loss. Be completely honest and frank with yourself so that this information is meaningful. For example, benefits to losing 20lbs. would include feeling, looking and moving better and pros might be time constraints, current physical limitations, etc. Then, return to the "T" and assess an objective value to each of the pros and cons with one, being least important, and ten being critical or most important. Now, place the pros and cons into order from least to most important on the flip side of the paper. What is revealed is often game-changing and may enable you to positively define or redefine your fitness value proposition for life.

Jackie Wright is the owner/manager of Mountain Life Fitness, LLC located in Granby, Colorado. She may be reached at her website at http://www.mtnlifefitness.com, her email at jackie@mtnlifefitness.com and her Facebook page at Mountain Life Fitness.

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