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Grand County real estate sales, June 13-19

Grand County’s real estate transactions June 13-19 were worth more than $22.2 million combined.

• ACR West Unit 3, Sub Ex Lot 2 – Jaimee and Greg Keene, Jackie and Richard Zurawski to Steven and Leigh Dunn, $151,000

• Lake Forest 1st Addn Subdivision Lot 1, Block 3 – Roger Baldwin and Sherol Roy to Brent and Beth Flambures, $725,000

• Hi Country Haus Bldg 8, Unit 4 – Lexi and Gregory Abolofia to Layla Destaffany and Summer Smith, $420,000

• East Mountain Filing 1, Lot 20 – Christian A Laursen Revocable Trust and Olga Laursen Revocable Trust to Kerkbrink LLC, $2,600,000

• Innsbruck-Val Moritz Sub Lot 28, Block 21 – Dahl Marital Trust to Nicole McKinney and Christopher McWilliams, $50,000

• Columbine Lake Block 10, Lots 69, 70 – Rebecca Ann Foss Williams to Robert Shamo and Brian Owens, $1,200,000

• Colorado Anglers Club #1, Lot 6, Block 8 – Clary and April Jarvis, Stuart Coleman to Soonie Suh Living Trust, $54,500

• Grand View Ranch Lot 4 – Connie and Randy Marcy to Gregory and Teresa Miller, $55,000

• Winterstar Condos Unit 2, Bldg F – Lawrence Bruce Christine and Dorothy A Mueller Christine to Jennifer and Matthew Golden, $535,000

• Bear Crossing Town Homes Lot 6 – Kristana Geonetta to Dennis Kirkman, $1,250,000

• Old Park Filing #2, Lot 11, Block A – Leroy and Patsy Haverland to Stephen Allen, $594,500

• Fraser River Development Co LLC to Bonanza Homes LLC, $600,000

• Roam Filing No 1, Block 7, Lots 11, 12; Roam Filing No 1, Block 8, Lots 4, 5, 6, 7 – Fraser River Development Co LLLC to Bonanza Homes LLC, $600,000

• Elk Creek at Grand Park Filing No 2, Lot 34 – Richard and Claire Stansberry to Richard Stansberry Trust and Claire Stansberry Trust, $500

• Red Quill Village Townhomes Lot 5 – Robert and Duane Saunders to Robert and Valerie Cannistraro, $1,175,000

• Base Camp One Condos Unit 304-R – Tracy and Christopher Hahnle to Jeffery and Amber Anderson, $318,000

• Winter Park Place Condo Unit 5, Bldg Sterling Way – Amy Diaz and Eric Hewit to Garrett Olson, $429,000

• Pine Beach Subdivision Hillside Addn Lot 3, Block 6 – Daniel G Heidelmeyer Revocable Trust and Karen S Heidelmeyer Revocable Trust to Bens Bedroom Trust, $39,900

• Cozens Pointe at Grand Park Unit 101, Bldg I – Heather and James Hankins to Ashley and Karl Oeler, $712,500

• Meadow Ridge Lodges Court 29, Unit 5 – Holly and John Liberatore to Joel and Beth Houwer, $490,000

• Ranches Devils Thumb Lot 9A – Ranches at Devils Thumb Inc to Buckrail Bend Investment LLC, $1,800,000

• East Mountain Filing No 11, Lot 21; East Mountain Filing No 11, Lot 21G – Rendezvous Homes LLC, Koelbel Company to Ian Roth and Katy Hyman Roth, $756,177

• Elk Creek Condominiums at Grand Park Lot 1, Unit A103; Elk Creek Condominiums at Grand Park Lot 1, Garage Unit 6 3 – Elk Creek Multifamily LLC to Matthew Kadillak and Jane Arambel, $896,863

• Big Horn Park Filing #2, Lot 51 – Ronald and Pamela Hagen to Michael and Casey Pelzl, $47,000

• Timbers Condominiums Unit 1, Bldg 9 – Happy Hollow Farms Inc to Charles and Judith Jones, $625,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 3, Lot 11 – Jeffrey and Kelly Vogel to Garret Black, $137,000

• Bavarian Village Condo Unit 12, Bldg B – Craig and Michelle Austin to Russell and Lauren Bennett, $585,000

• Grand Lake Hideaway Condo Unit 3B, Bldg Lodge – Jackson Marshall to Bruce and Beverly Gorthy, $340,000

• Innsbruck-Val Moritz Subdivision, Lot 23, Block 21 –Geraldine Frost to Sumant and Courtney Bhat, $859,000

• Val Moritz Village 2nd Filing, Lot 9, Block 3 – Scott and Elizabeth Wetzler to Sandra Mazarakis and Neil Burris, $93,500

• Longview Addn/Hot Sulphur Springs Block 7, Lots 25, 26, 27 – Ryohei Dokai to Patrick and Mary Wagner, $38,000

• Grand Lake Estates 1st Filing Lot 2, Block 6 – Nicole Solgot to Ruben Patino, $410,000

• Rabbit Ears Village Subdivision Lot 64 – Dawne Kleinwachter to Karla and Kenneth Grossnickle, $65,000

• Granby Block 2, Lots 15, 16 – AFBN LLC to Mark Bishop, $400,000

• East Mountain Filing 3, Lot 1 – Stacey and Kimberly Perry to Ryan Moriarty, $864,000

• Blue Valley Acres Lot 5, Block 5 – Andrew Swang and Brenda Noakes to Timothy and Erin Vermeer, $600,000

• Fraser Crossing-Founders Pointe Condominium Unit 3314 – Kevin and Julia Grossman to Sunil and Anne Jani, $606,250

• Colorado Anglers Club #1, Lot 23, Block 11 – Baby Moose Investments LLC to Cortney Fernandez Decastro, $32,500

• Colorado Anglers Club #1, Lot 24, Block 11 – Baby Moose Investments LLC to Cortney Fernandez Decastro, $32,500

• Soda Springs Ranch Filing 2, Unit D-3, TRT A – Tina Woolley to Amy and Brian Richie, $355,000

• Granby 2nd Block 7, Lots 29, 30, 31, 32 – Richard Kittler to Michael Brooks, $585,000

• Breckon Subdivision TRT 33 Partial Legal – See Document – David and Maire Mallard to Ty A Peteranetz Family Trust and Markeya S Peteranetz Family Trust, $75,000

Winter Park approves wage increase for staff

Winter Park approved an across-the-board raise for town staff that had initially been paused due to the coronavirus pandemic’s expected impact on the budget.

On Tuesday, the council unanimously approved a 3% wage increase for Winter Park employees. The increase will be retroactive to January, including the town manager and police department. The the raises will cost the town about $120,000.

“Please let everyone know how great of a job they’ve done,” Winter Park Mayor Nick Kutrumbos said to town staff on Tuesday.

Finance Director Lizbeth Lemley said the town’s budget rebounded during a successful winter season after the pandemic cut into sales tax revenues in the early part of 2020.

As a result of the downturn, Winter Park didn’t budget a raise and town staff were the only municipal employees to not receive an increase for 2021, Lemley said.

“Due to the fact that when we did the budget, we had so much uncertainty about how our winter would play out and the COVID financial impact, we didn’t propose any raises for staff at that time,” Lemley said. “The council asked us to re-review after ski season and I’m happy to say that … we had a really successful winter, more so than we had budgeted.”

In addition to the raises, council updated the 2021 budget to reflect expenditures over the budgeted amounts and some transfers between town funds. The transit fund was also adjusted to add expenses for two new buses and purchasing a piece of land for the transit maintenance facility.

The affordable housing fund was updated to reflect the increased cost of infrastructure for the Hideaway Junction neighborhood and repairs at the Hideaway Place apartments. The capital projects fund was adjusted for expenses related to the public works facility.

Council also approved updating the general fund to add a staff member to oversee short-term rentals and a potential role for sustainability, should the town receive grant funding to offset the cost of that employee. The cost of implementing the new marijuana ordinance was also added to the general fund expenses.

In other business:

• Council approved special event permits for summer events hosted by the Winter Park Fraser Chamber of Commerce and Cooper Creek Square, as well as the Alpine Art Affair and the G3 bike race.

• A second reading of the marijuana ordinance and the first reading of a marijuana fee schedule were tabled over concerns about using a lottery system to decide which businesses would get the three marijuana licenses in Winter Park. Council is expected to discuss the licensing process and fee schedule at the July 6 meeting and workshop.

• A preliminary plat for the Jane Creek condos was approved with several conditions. The project would bring 42 two and three bedroom units to Iron Horse Way.

• Council approved the rezoning of Kings Crossing Plaza from residential commercial district to destination center district.

• A request for an extension of service on the Red Line of the Lift for four new stops in Rendezvous was denied due to lack of public support.

Grand County real estate sales, June 6-12

Grand County’s real estate transactions June 6-12 were worth more than $33.6 million combined.

• Haikus Cove Subdivision Unit 2, Bldg B – Austin and Bayleigh Gray to Valerie Laskowski Martinez and Solar Martinez, $495,000

• Mountain Shadows Estates AFP Lot R-21 – Samuel Nelson Archer to Sandra Finley Brown and Erik Marquard Brown, $340,000

• Vasquez Village Condominiums Unit 6, Bldg 2 – Gary and Bridget Keating to Retima Dangol Maharjan and Robert Ranney, $725,000

• Village at Mountain Sky Grand Elk Ranch & Club Lot D-53 – Wales Enterprises LLC to MCCRITT2 LLC, $715,000

• Zephyr Mountain Lodge Condo Bldg 1 & 2, Unit 2700 – Silver Sunset LLC to Week2Week Rentals LLC, $775,000

• Fraser Crossing-Founders Pointe Condominium Unit 3417 – Brian and Kristy Murphy to Michael Siefford and Linda Harrison, $525,000

• Pole Creek Meadows Lot 42, Block 1 – Cary D Morrow Revocable Trust to Stephen and Kelly Moran, $1,025,000

• Zephyr Mountain Lodge Condo Bldg 1 & 2, Unit 2100 – Gregory and Sharon Anderson to Loeffler Family LLC, $717,500

• Elk Ridge Estates Subdivision Exemption Lot 3 – Alice and Daniel Zwahlen to Alex Karamatsoukas, $1,550,000

• Kicking Horse Lodges Unit 3 302, Bldg 3 – Sutherland West LLC, Kathleen Sutherland to Amy and David Sebesta, $465,250

• Fairways at Pole Creek PH 1 & Open Space Lot 1 26 – Susan and Richard Reed to Linda Wenzek Barth, $245,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 6, Lot 3 – Tyrrell Consulting Defined Benefit Pension Plan to Trainko Enterprises Inc, $84,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 6, Lot 20 – Robert and Shelly Miller to Trainko Enterprises Inc, $89,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 6, Lot 44 – Michael and Wendi Mahoney to Trainko Enterprises Inc, $94,500

• Granby Ranch Filing 6, Lot 25 – Ingrid S Wang Revocable Trust to Trainko Enterprises Inc, $79,000

• Winter Park Ranch 1st Filing Lot 45 – Stephen Allen to Robert Beam and Dominique Verrecchia, $950,000

• Summit at SilverCreek Bldg 3, Unit 3306 – Tammy Moss to Amber Pruett Conn and Ashley Griffith, $265,000

• Lakeridge Subdivision Flg #1, 11, 12 – Michael and Jackie McCormick to Svenja Akkira Knappe, Stephen Gorman Butler, Marja Kristina and Vladislav Pavlov Gerginov, $620,000

• Pole Creek Valley Subdivision Lot 96 –Trenton Huber to Winter Park Collective LLC, $1,165,000

• East Mountain Filing No 11, Lots 22, 22G – Rendezvous Homes LLC, Koelbel Company to Tisa and Derek Van Dyke, $699,955

• Granby Ranch Filing 2B, Lot 59 – Jeremy and Rebecca Matter to Michael and Sheila Kuretich, $905,000

• SECS 7,8 TWP 1N R 76W Partial Legal – See Documents – OGK LLC to GRCO LLC, $675,000

• Village at Wildhorse Grand Elk Ranch & Club Lot E47 – Paul and Marti Bleidt to Matthew and Jennier Grennan, $34,000

• Hideaway Station Unit RU TE 202, Bldg E; Hideaway Station Parking Space R 202 – Craig and Janine Harner to Jason and Sally Komora, $770,000

• Hi Country Haus Bldg 19, Unit 5 – Kazeroon Family Trust to Kerry and Alison Hoffman, $660,000

• Fraser Crossing-Founders Pointe Condominium Unit 3302 – Brandan and Kaly Lebourdais to Far Peak Holdings LLC, $799,900

• West Portal Place Condo Unit A – Virginia Temmer, Brian and Jane Lambert to Ski Country Holdings LLC, $276,000

• Zephyr Mountain Lodge Condo Bldg 1 & 2, Unit 2418 – Rachel Zelon Living Trust and Jeffery Donald Luterbach Living Trust to Hyline Drive 1839 LLC and Hull Street 1901 LLC, $540,000

• Bear Crossing Town Homes Lot 27 – Iain Davidson and Kavita Kesaree to Mark and Monica Pijanowski, $1,025,000

• Fairways at Pole Creek PH 1 & Open Space Lot 3 41 – Robin Castellino to Ryszard Cetnarowski Trust and JoAnna Cetnarowski Trust, $202,000

• Hot Sulphur Springs Lot 3, Block 16 – Kathleen and Alexander Taft to Win Park and Shannon Winegarner, $330,000

• Legacy Park Ranch Lot 101 – David and Marian Johnson to Ray and Paula Keefe, $225,000

• Coyote Creek at Winter Park Unit 28, Lot 24 – ABW Reos LLC to Moes Mr Montana Trust, $75,000

• Winter Walk Condo Unit 2, Bldg A – John and Tamara Hermes to Staning Willow LLC, $770,000

• Silver Ridge Townhomes Bldgs 1, Units A through D; Bldg 2, Units A through H; Bldg 3, Units A through D; Bldg 4, Units A through H; Bldg 5, Units A through H; Bldg 6, Units A through D; Bldg 7, Units A through H; Bldg 8, Units A through H; Bldg 9, Units A through H; Bldg 10, Units A through D; Bldg 11, Units A through H; Bldg 12, Units A through H; Bldg 13, Units A through H; Bldg 14, Units A through H, Bldg 15, Units A through H; Bldg 16, Units A through D; Bldg 17, Units A through H; Bldg 18, Units A through H; Bldg 19, Units A through H; Bldg 20, Units A through H; Bldg 21, Units A through H; Bldg 22, Units A through D; Bldg 23, Units A through H; Bldg 24, Units A through H; Bldg 25, Units A through D; Bldg 26, Units A through H; Bldg 27, Units A through D – Silver Ridge Rocky Mountain LLC to Silver Ridge Village LLC, $1,840,000

• High Lonesome Trail Estate IV, Lot 4 3 – Anthony and Shayna Whitehouse to Whitehouse Family Trust, $500

• Hot Sulphur Springs Lot 9, Block 11 – Kirsten and Kevin Anderberg to Jeanne Power, $184,200

• Villa Harbor Subdivision Lot 15, Block 2 – Ricky Miller to Randall and Linda Peterson, $575,000

• Hi County Haus Bldg 14, Unit 19 – Sheri and Robert Schultz to Todd and Meredith Townsend, $289,000

• SEC 30 TWP 1N R 76W Partial Legal – See Document – Homestead Capital Company Inc to Anchor Highway Forty LLC, $3,050,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 5 First Administrative Plat Lot 18 – Meghan and Lance Gerlach to Keri Burson and Lendell Myers, $660,000

• Legacy Park Ranch Lot 3 – Dorothy Lizabeth Smith Revocable Trust to Zackery and Nancy Belcher, $1,100,000

• Hideaway Village South Lot 24 – Brian Lambden to Iris and Ashley McClish, $1,000,000

• Winter Park Lodge II, Bldg E, Unit 103 – Emily and Jennifer Harrison to Clinton and Shanna Evans, Michael Hicks, $425,000

• Hi Country Haus Bldg 9, Unit 3 – Emma Widmayer Davis and Cary Garfinkel to Michael and Tracy Servantes, $330,000

• Kremmling Country Addition Lot 5, Block 6 – Lonie Ragsdale to William Kyrioglou, $343,000

• Frontier Investment Company Addition to Kremmling Block 6, Lots 8, 9, 10 – Ricardo Alonzo Gutierrez Quezada to Jeremy Gunesch, $384,000

• East Mountain Filing 8, Lot 62, Bldg 7 – Casey and Tessa Clement to Ragan and Corey McMeeking, Catherine and Leon Swain, $806,000

• SEC 22 TWP 3N R 76W Partial Legal – See Document – Hannah Stovall and Jonathan Richard Berryhill to Purchasing Fund 2020-1 LLC, $635,000

• Val Moritz Village 2nd Filing, Lot 9, Block 5 – Aspen Acres of Grand County LLC to Bradley and Jayme Moss, $55,000

• Innsbruck-Val Moritz Sub Lot 2, Block 13 – Beverly Gray Testamentary Trust to Eric and Kelli Visage, $20,000

• Fairways at Pole Creek PH 1 & Open Space Lot 3-1 – Fairways Pole Creek Development LLC to Annette and Jeffrey Pilkington, $178,000

• Elk Creek Condominiums at Grand Park Lot 1, Unit A-101; Elk Creek Condominiums at Grand Park Lot 2, Garage Unit 30-1 – Elk Creek Multifamily LLC to Victoria and Ronald Nyman, $496,449

• Gore City Addn to Kremmling Block 14, Lots 9, 10 – Shuei and Valerie Kato to Toby and Samantha Meister, $419,000

• Summit at SilverCreek Bldg 3, Unit 3203 – DTH Holdings LLC to Scott Foran-Hall and JoAnna Hall, $313,000

• Shorewood Subdivision Lot 4, Block 2 – Ralph Riedel to Russell Neal and Maryann Staab, $164,900

• Winter Glen Final Plat Lot 20 – Evan and Kelli Eddy to Sharyn and Edgar Guhman, Lisa and Jason Sharpe, Diana Benedict, $1,050,000

• Pole Creek Meadows Lot 2, Block 6 – Steven and Linda Bailey to Great Scott Ventures LLC, $115,000

• Trade Exchange Rockies Inc Minor Subdivision 1, Lot 11A – Andrea and Jess Buller to Kevin and Christina Hurley, $330,000

 

U.S. ski industry up, Aspen Skiing Co. down in pandemic plagued winter

A group of skiers and snowboarders make it down the mountain on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021, at Snowmass Ski Area. (Photo by Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times)

While the U.S. ski industry logged its fifth-best season ever in 2020-21, Aspen Skiing Co. experienced a tough winter during the pandemic.

Denver-based National Ski Areas Association announced Tuesday that the country’s resort recorded about 59 million skier and snowboard rider visits this winter. Many resorts were able to capitalize on the high desire of people to get outside during the COVID-19 pandemic. One big trend was that people stuck close to home and skied at their hometown hills or ski resorts closest to them, according to NSAA.

Aspen Skiing Co. faced a tough time because international travel was almost non-existent and fewer “long haulers” within the U.S. ventured out for trips, according to Jeff Hanle, Skico vice president of communications.

“Those two pieces are really what we didn’t see this year,” he said Tuesday.

The year started slow for Skico because Australians couldn’t travel here in droves as they usually do in January. Group business was wiped out because of capacity limits and physical distancing requirements. Numerous domestic travelers canceled trips as the pandemic worsened and Pitkin County required arrivals to sign an affidavit acknowledging they hadn’t had COVID symptoms for 10 days and have either been vaccinated or have received a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of arriving in Pitkin County. Visitors also were required to quarantine for 10 days if they were not tested before arrival.

In addition, the snow was crummy in January. All those factors added up a rough start of ski season.

“January and the beginning of February were about as bad as they could be for us,” Hanle said.

Ski season by the numbers

– U.S. ski areas logged about 59 million skier visits. It was the fifth busiest season ever.

– Rocky Mountain region (Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico) totaled 22.5 million skier visits. The average for the prior 10 years was about 21.1 million.

– Aspen Skiing Co. was just below 1.2 million skier visits. “It certainly wasn’t our fifth-best season ever,” spokesman Jeff Hanle said.

Sources: National Ski Areas Association and Aspen Skiing Co.

In contrast, mid-March to mid-April was better than even a “normal” year, according to Hanle.

“We came out just short of 1.2 million visits,” he said.

That was down between 3% and 4% from 2019-20, which was on pace for a record before ski season came to an abrupt end by order of Colorado Gov. Jared Polis on March 14, 2020.

However, Skico was down about 20% in skier and snowboarder visits for its five-year average, according to Hanle.

Local skiers and riders took advantage of their opportunities on the slopes. Season pass sales and use soared.

“We did see really strong pass use,” Hanle said.

While Skico officials are optimistic about building off the late-season momentum next season, there is still plenty of uncertainty. The prime booking period for many overseas travelers is coming up soon. Skico and partners are providing incentives by promising full refunds on lift tickets and lodging for international guests who find they cannot travel next winter because of the pandemic.

“At this point we don’t expect to see the Australians in January (2021),” Hanle said.

For the U.S. ski industry as a whole, 2020-21 exceeded expectations. The latest season was on par with 2018-19 when there were 59.34 million visits.

The ski industry’s record season was 2010-11 when there were 60.54 million visits. The 2007-08 season was the only other one to top 60 million.

The 10-year average for national skier visits is nearly 55 million, so that puts the strength of the latest campaign into perspective.

After being forced to close abruptly starting March 15, 2020, most resorts were able to stay open the entire season this winter. The average U.S. resort was open 112 days this winter compared with 99 days the prior campaign. In NSAA’s annual Kottke End-of-Season Survey, 78% of resorts that responded said the season exceeded their expectations.

“Small- and medium-sized ski areas (defined by lift capacity) performed well this winter, with more guests choosing to stay close to home for ski trips, and increased local demand for outdoor recreation in general,” NSAA said in its statement.

Many resorts were forced to adopt capacity limits of skiers and riders on the slopes and at indoor facilities such as restaurants. The pandemic also enhanced the trend of the ski industry to encourage advanced lift ticket purchases.

Window sales of lift tickets fell from 46% in 2019-20 to just 17% in 2020-21, according to NSAA. Visits from pass use increased from 45% in 2019-20 to 51% this winter.

Skiers and riders also showed their flexibility by hitting the slopes more frequently on weekdays. Weekday visitation was responsible for 48% of total visits. That was up 27% from the season before, according to NSAA.

A strong season for skier visits didn’t necessarily mean resorts raked in the cash. Revenue data is still being analyzed, but NSAA noted that ski lessons fell by 30% season over season. Public health orders prohibited large groups, so ski areas had to offer smaller classes.

Hanle said Skico officials aren’t despairing because national visits were up while Skico was down. The 2020-21 season proved people want to be outdoors and they still want to hit the slopes, he said.

“We don’t look at it as people did better than us,” Hanle said. Instead, company officials say the message of the season is that people still want to ski and ride. “Better luck next year” is the prevailing attitude.

scondon@aspentimes.com

Grand County real estate sales, May 30-June 5

Grand County’s real estate transactions May 30 to June 5 were worth more than $13.2 million combined.

• Shadow Crest Condo Unit 4B, Bldg 4 — James, Wesley and Luella Sanborn to Matthew and Melissa Reiss, $375,000

• Gore City Addn to Kremmling Block 3, Lots 14, 15, 16 — Paul Schwarz to Alexander Gardner, $447,446

• Shadow Mountain Estates Lot M-4 — Greenlee Colorado Property Management LLC to Howard and Janis Baker, $1,556,000

• Lions Gate Pines Lodge Condo Unit 103, Week 31 – Lions Gate Pines Lodge Condominiums Association Inc to Stephanie Agler and Janet Crowder, $1,000

• Lake Forest 1st Addn Subdivision Lot 30, Block 1 – Steven and Beverly Johnson to Steven L Johnson Living Trust, $500

• Lake Forst 1st Addn Subdivision Lots 24, 25, Block 1 – Steven and Beverly Johnson to Steven L Johnson Living Trust, $500

• Grand Lake Lot 2, Block 11 – Judy Burke to RSH Properties LLC, $375,000

• East Mountain Filing 7, Lot 100 – Marc and Karen Ordelheide to Ted and Kristy Smith, $932,500

• Aspen Meadows Condominiums Unit 302, Bldg D; Aspen Meadows Condominiums Garage Tract 6, Unit 40 – Mark and Camille Lowe to Carrie Farberow and Stephen Saye, $445,000

• Village at Horseshoe Creek Grand Elk Ranch & Club Unit F2 – Cheryl Olson to David and Helen Giocomo, $725,000

• Innsbruck-Val Moritz Sub Lot 31, Block 21 – Cross Family Living Trust to Nicholas Johnson and Allysa Cross, $650,000

• Aspen Meadows Condominiums Unit 203, Bldg E – Robert and Julie Clark to Michael and Elizabeth Geppner, $482,500

• Wolf Park Townhome FP Lot A1 – Kimberly Campbell Sisco and Brett Sisco to John and Tiffani Beltz, $725,000

• Lakeview Waterside West Condos As Built Bldg E, Garage Unit E – Michael and Ann Muldrow to Mario and Charlotte Zuniga, $41,750

• Mountainside at SilverCreek B U 71 Timeshare 071112 – Dennis Carroll to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Association, $500

• Kicking Horse Lodges Unit 203, Bldg 2 – Vicki Bondurant Urban to Chris and Audrey Weatherman, $432,000

• Hi Country Haus Bldg 13, Units 11,12 – Steven and Robin Myers to Bradley Scoular, Ryan Barwick and Elisabeth Havlik, $511,000

• Kremmling Country Addition Lot 8, Block 6 – Robert and Leslie Roller to Maureen Flannagan, $420,000

• Silverado II Condo Unit 422, Bldg 4 – John and Kristen Torres to Richard Cho and Nicole Pinder, $390,000

• Innsbruck-Val Moritz Sub Lot 72, Block 17 – Spruce Drive LLC to Daniel and Heather Mellish, $875,500

• Inn at SilverCreek PH II Condo Unit 418 – George R Tyrrell Trust and Elizabeth A Tyrrell Trust to Monique Mora, $152,000

• Base Camp One Condos Unit 209R – Lucas and Jennifer Bostyan to Rachel and Todd Morris, $508,000

• Silversage Subdivision Lot 3, Block 1 – Nancy Roark to Armin Klotz, $552,000

• Himebaughs 1st Addition Hot Sulphur Springs B1-B2, N2 B3-B4, Block 4, Lots 12, 13, 14, 15 – Max L Webel Declaration Trust and Kathryn M Webel Declaration Trust to Jesse Lisenby, $40,000

• Pines at Meadow Ridge Court D, Unit 12 – David and Christine Hickey to Justin and Ashlee Franklin, $427,000

• Big Horn Park Filing #1, Lot 40 – Wendell and Evelyn Bohall to Donald Phelps Case IV, $470,000

• Perry L. Miller Tracts Lots 9, 10 – Tim and Karen Morgen to Evelyn Bolt, $83,000

• Mountainside at SilverCreek B U 26- Mountainside SilverCreek Fractional Ownership Condominium Assoc. Inc. to Carl Paul, $235,000

• Trademark at Winter Park Condo Unit 103A – James and Lori Bachtel to Hueppchen Trust, Lisa Ernst, $875,000

• Fraser Crossing-Founders Pointe Condominium Unit 4279 – Jason Huey to Stephanie and Jared Winters, $436,000

• Homestead Hills Subdivision Filing #2, Lot 3 – George and Diana Madelen to Aaron Anderson and Lauran Jansson, $85,000

Winter Park workforce housing project back on track

A construction drawing of the Fireside Creek workforce housing project. On Tuesday, the project received approval to cover more of the lot than is allowed under zoning for increased parking.
Winter Park agenda

After an initial setback, Winter Park’s Fireside Creek workforce housing project is moving forward thanks to approval of a variance for the lot coverage.

On Tuesday, the Board of Adjustment approved a variance for the project to allow for 56% coverage on the lot, specifically to allow for uncovered parking, since the zoning for the lot restricts coverage to 40%. Discussion and public comment on the variance took place over two meetings, with the first on May 11.

“I think the town and the developer have met the obligations for this variance and that the additional spaces will not alter the neighborhood and allow for a good development,” Brad Holzwarth, chair of the board, said.

Winter Park Partners, the developers of Fireside Creek, told the board that they were asking for the variance to keep the project financially feasible, since covered parking would cost eight to 10 times as much as per space as uncovered parking.

In addition, the developers want to make sure there is enough parking for the residents so as to minimize street parking. With the variance, the project would have a total of 70 spaces, which is more than the required amount.

“The current site plan was settled on based on the awkward lot configuration, vehicular circulation, as well as turning radius and movements for trash and emergency vehicles,” Jim Potter, a Winter Park Partners representative said.

Surrounding neighbors of the project lobbied heavily for the variance to fail, citing concerns about increased traffic and changing the character of the neighborhood. Neighbors had previously defeated a height variance for the project, which shrunk the total number of units at the development from 66 to 50.

John Thompson, president of the Wolf Park Townhomes Homeowners Association, told the board that he believes the project would change the character of the neighborhood because of the strip style parking and density of the buildings.

“We do oppose the over development of this site,” Thompson said. “Fireside Creek is not going to solve our workforce housing problem with one swift project. Attempting to increase the density significantly beyond what this unique and challenging site can reasonably support … seems very short-sided to me.”

However, local business owners, longtime residents and other neighbors showed up to support the project and the variance. Many business owners shared their recent challenges hiring and keeping staff because of the lack of affordable housing.

Others argued the project was important to maintain the character of the town by allowing employees to live where they work.

“Essential character is subjective, but to me, essential is the key word and nothing could be more essential than affordable housing,” Ryan Barwick, owner of Grand Adventures and Mad Adventures, said. “I implore you to approve this request to meet the demands and needs of your constituents.”

Ultimately, the board agreed and none of the five deciding members spoke against the lot coverage variance.

Winter Park Town Manager Keith Riesberg said the next steps will be taking a resolution to the town council that will likely increase the town’s financial contribution to the project so that it can move forward with capping rents at 120% Area Median Income.

 

Top 5 most read stories on SkyHiNews.com, week of May 30

Large lodgepole pine trees are unloaded for processing at the Montrose sawmill in this 2006 file photo. (William Woody, Special to The Colorado Sun)

1. The slow fade of Colorado’s mountain pine beetle is triggering a massive shift in the timber industry

Colorado’s forests have been waging a losing battle against tree-killing beetles for more than 15 years. Now, after marching across the state and killing millions of acres of pine forest, the burrowing, fungus-spreading mountain pine beetles are slowly losing steam.

While other beetles have thrived in Colorado’s drought-ravaged mountains, the mountain pine beetles have reigned as the state’s most nefarious pest. But the mountain pine beetle epidemic was always going to end, as there are only so many ponderosa and lodgepole trees in the 3.3 million acres affected by the tree-killing insects in Colorado.

And with that decline, a timber industry that has thrived on a once seemingly endless flow of dead pine trees is transitioning to new types of timber and logging.

— Jason Blevins, Colorado Sun

2. Man arrested in connection with Fraser bank robberies

Authorities have arrested a man they believe is connected to two bank robberies in Fraser, including one Wednesday at the United Business Bank and the robbery of the same bank in January.

James W. Smith, 57, is facing two charges of aggravated robbery after being arrested around noon Wednesday in Empire.

According to police, an officer at a car wreck on Berthoud Pass recognized a dark Toyota sedan and its driver as matching the descriptions from the Fraser Winter Park Police Department.

3. Police: Fraser bank robbed again

Police have released images of a man they say robbed the United Business Bank in Fraser on Wednesday.

According to Fraser Winter Park Police, someone at the bank reported the robbery at 11:34 a.m. Wednesday. Within an hour police had posted several images of the robber and a vehicle on social media.

Police said the suspect closely resembles the man who robbed the same bank on Jan. 6, who entered the bank and gave employees a note demanding money. That man was also tied to a Jan. 14 bank robbery in Frisco.

4. Colorado cities will be able to require developers to build affordable housing in new rental projects

A 20-year-old court precedent that has blocked Colorado cities and towns from forcing developers to build affordable housing in new rental projects is no more, after Gov. Jared Polis signed a bill into law Friday.

“Communities are strongest when people who work in a community can live in the community, and that’s something that sadly we have been losing,” said Polis, a Democrat, at a bill signing ceremony Friday.

House Bill 1117 modifies state land use statutes so local governments can require below-market-rate units in new or redeveloped rental projects without running afoul of the state’s rent-control prohibition. It reverses the effects of a 2000 Colorado Supreme Court ruling that restrained local governments for years.

— Thy Vo, Colorado Sun

5. Granby Corner Mall owner will miss running antique store

Filled to the brim with an eclectic assortment of goods, the floors of the Granby Corner Mall creak with every step.

The unique antique store sits inside a 100-year-old building on the corner of Granby’s main street. The ceiling is covered with its original tiles, an intricate pattern above the amalgamation of people, tales — and maybe even ghosts — as interesting as the goods Shannon Kerber sells.

Kerber initially had a booth at the antique store and took over the business a couple years ago when the owner died. Now, the Corner Mall is changing hands.

Winter Park to allow marijuana dispensaries, delivery

Months of discussion resulted in Winter Park Town Council approving the sale of retail and medical marijuana in town, as well as medical marijuana delivery.

On Tuesday, the council unanimously approved the first reading of an ordinance outlining legal sales in town and implementing a 5% special tax on sales. The ordinance allows for three business licenses — two in the downtown area and one in Old Town — which is one less than previously discussed.

Previously, Winter Park didn’t allow marijuana dispensaries within town limits. The Serene Wellness dispensary is located in unincorporated Grand County. The ordinance allows for the annexation of the land moving forward without repercussions for the dispensary.

The town will use a lottery system to decide who the licenses are distributed to and the ordinance requires all dispensaries be 500 feet away from each other. Previously, Town Manager Keith Riesberg indicated there were a number of interested businesses.

In addition to sales, Winter Park will allow for medical marijuana delivery in Grand County, meaning any dispensaries in town will be able to deliver to medical card holding customers anywhere in Grand. The town will be one of the first in Colorado to implement marijuana delivery after it became legal in 2019.

Revenue from the 5% special sales tax, which was passed by voters in 2020, will be split between mental health initiatives and the general fund.

The second reading of the ordinance is scheduled for the next town council meeting June 15. Licenses will be available 30 days after passage.

In other business:

• Council kicked off the annexation process for a four acre lot along US Highway 40 and Village Drive, next to the Beaver Village and Snowblaze condominiums. The lot currently has a single family home on it with no other development. The annexation next goes to the planning commission on July 13.

• An agreement with Community Planning Services was approved for additional capacity reviewing for proposed developments. CSP staff would analyze proposed developments to ensure they meet Town Code, design standards and the town’s master plan. The agreement comes at no cost to the town since developers would reimburse the cost of the work.

• The town tapped Butler|Snow as bond counsel for the $7 million in Certificates of Participation the town anticipates needing to fund the Transit Maintenance Facility. Butler|Snow provided bond counsel to Winter Park for its recently completed public works building.

• Big Valley Construction received the contract for infrastructure work at the second phase of Hideaway Junction, the town’s single family, workforce restricted neighborhood. The town will pay $1.1 million for the work.

• Elite Surface Infrastructure was awarded the contract for street and sidewalk improvements in Winter Park. The town had budgeted $350,000 for the work, but by partnering with Fraser for the bid, the work will only cost $286,237. The targeted streets include Old Town Drive from US 40 to Winter Park Drive; Winter Park Drive to Zephyr Way; Forest Trail from King’s Crossing to Elk Trail; and Elk Trail to Moose Trail.

• Council approved special event permits for Mountain Moon Yoga at Wolf and Confluence Parks and for summer events at the Headwaters Center.

• An amendment to the final development plan for the Winter Park Preserve received final approval.

• Winter Park updated its town code to address the number, location and size of wireless community facilities, such as cell towers.

 

The slow fade of Colorado’s mountain pine beetle is triggering a massive shift in the timber industry

Large lodgepole pine trees are unloaded for processing at the Montrose sawmill in this 2006 file photo. (William Woody, Special to The Colorado Sun)

Colorado’s forests have been waging a losing battle against tree-killing beetles for more than 15 years. Now, after marching across the state and killing millions of acres of pine forest, the burrowing, fungus-spreading mountain pine beetles are slowly losing steam.

While other beetles have thrived in Colorado’s drought-ravaged mountains, the mountain pine beetles have reigned as the state’s most nefarious pest. But the mountain pine beetle epidemic was always going to end, as there are only so many ponderosa and lodgepole trees in the 3.3 million acres affected by the tree-killing insects in Colorado.

And with that decline, a timber industry that has thrived on a once seemingly endless flow of dead pine trees is transitioning to new types of timber and logging.

This also means the end is near for the coveted blue-stained wood the pests leave behind. They spread a fungus in trees, leaving a distinctive blue hue that has made beetle-kill lodgepole a high-value wood for cabinetry, paneling and trim work.

Dave Sitton’s Aspen Wall Wood mill in Dolores transitioned from pure aspen paneling to mostly beetle kill almost 20 years ago. Now he’s preparing to transition back.

To continue reading this story, go to ColoradoSun.com.

Grand County real estate sales, May 23-29

Grand County’s real estate transactions May 23-29 were worth more than $21.4 million combined.

• Shores of Shadow Mountain FP Lot 41 – Randy and William Mitchem to Marie Chatterley, $194,000

• Grand View Park AFP Lot 9 – Claudia Konchar to Roger and Nancy Pinkley, $55,900

• Granby Ranch Filing 6, Lot 43 – Dart Holdings LLC to Seven Seven Investments LLC, $115,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 5 First Administrative Plat Lot 9 – Adam and Elizabeth Carewe to Layne and Leigh Litteer, $695,000

• Shadow Crest Condo Unit 1C, Bldg 1 – Curtis and Sally Immel to SCS Family Trust, $500

• Longview Addn/Hot Sulphur Springs Block 8, Lots 1, 2 – Habitat for Humanity Grand County Colorado Inc to Maria Archuleta Jones, $157,500

• Fairways at Pole Creek PH 1 & Open Space Lot 3 63 – Taishan Mountain Retreat LLC to Kurt Monigle and Trine Bumiller, $3,500,000

• Columbine Lake Lot 4, Block 11 – James and Patricia Cherrington to Susan and Michael Miller, $760,000

• Ideal Park Subdivision Partial Legal – See Document; SECS 11,12,13,14 TWP 1N R 78W Partial Legal – See Documents – Jones Creek Ranch LLC to Town of Hot Sulphur Springs Colorado – $499,920

• Beaver Village Flg #3, Bldg 19, Unit 202 – Chris Bryant and Ashley Nichols to Robert Leigh Jr, Robert Leigh III, $490,000

• Gore City Addn to Kremmling Block 4, Lots 14, 15 Partial Legal – See Document – CCGBD LLC to Tifany Rubalcaba, $289,999

• Leland Creek Sub Lot 52 – Scott and Christina Kline to Joshua Freedman and Sara Claude Michon, $463,000

• Innsbruck Val-Moritz Sub Block 7, Lots 2, 5 – Innsbruck Homes LLC to Paul and Scott Klees, $50,000

• Pine Ridge Sub Exempt Lot 1 – David and Emily Troutman to Jon and Lois Pratt, $1,400,000

• Cabins at Porcupine Ridge Lot 13B – Gordon and Lynne Ferguson to Philip James Richards Trust, $890,000

• Vista at Timber Run Condo Unit 5 – Lorre Brownson Olsen to Brady Bjornson and Katie Coyle, $284,500

• Parlay Ranch & Parcel 1 Lot 3 – Chandranath Subramaniam and Kristen Edwardsen to Tom and Mary Greenwell, $240,000

• Inn at SilverCreek PH II Condo Unit 550 – 62927 HWY 40 LLC to Jeffrey Marx and Carole Flood, $130,000

• Soda Springs Ranch AFP, Tract C, Tennis Unit 3D – Kevin Eldredge and Deborah Whitten to Cheney and Travis Bostic, $331,000

• Winter Park Highlands Greenridge Lot 70 – Judd and Eldeen Pickett to Eric and Carey Nyberg, $285,000

• Winter Park Highlands Unit 2, Lot 16 – John and Molly Leamon to Amy Scanlan and David Gesler, $485,000

• Ridge Elk Creek Subdivision Lot 5, Block 3 – Thomas Stanley to Mark and Debrah Richards, $61,000

• Soda Springs Ranch Filing 2, Unit 35 – Ronald and Sheri Tannascoli to John and Bonnie Deagostino, $149,000

• Casa Grande Estates TRT 23 – Scott and Robbin Stapleton to Michael Connelly, $250,000

• Shadow Mountain Estates 3rd Filing Lot 8 – Norman E Clausen Revocable Trust and Barbara A Clausen Revocable Trust to Stuga Getaway LLC, $535,000

• SECS 9,10 TWP 1S R 79W Partial Legal – See Document – Corline Henderson, Ross Merle Henderson Residuary Trust to Kenneth and Beth Hansen, $315,850

• Soda Springs Ranch AFP Tract C, Tennis Unit 3C – Gladys Dinges and Lori Holden to Erika Gallagher and Justin James Knapko Baum, $335,000

• Stagecoach Meadows Sub Lot 22 – Gordon and Penny Parker to D L and Wendy Griffin, $379,000

• Shores of Shadow Mountain FP Lot 40 – Niederbrach Family Trust to Janna Perry, $1,226,250

• Fairways at Pole Creek PH 1 & Open Space Lot 4 22 – Scott and Karen Tuke to David Kaso and Clara Ines Diaz, $210,000

• Soda Springs Ranch Filing No. 3, Lot 30 – Donald and Beverly Freng to Kolby and Alicia O’Herron, $1,000,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 1B, Lot 26 – Darren St Laurent Trust to 3 South Self Storage LLC, $1,099,000

• Base Camp One Condos Unit 207 R – Nicholas, JoAnne and Janet Kameron to Stephen and Kathleen Smith, $480,000

• Granby Lot 18, Block 6 – Frank and Lisa Parrish, Lisa Carlson to Stacy Nation and Billy Calderon, $600,000

• Pole Creek Valley Subdivision Lots 33, 34 – Jeff and Becky Imgrund to Stanislav and Tomas Kovalevskis, $250,000

• Heinis Addition to Kremmling Block 6, Lots 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 – Forward Inc to Hill Holdings LLC, $550,000

• Mountainside at SilverCreek C U 100 Timeshare 100650 – Lee Family Trust to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Association, $500

• Mountainside at SilverCreek B U 71 Timeshare 071128 – Oscar and Toni Campos to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Association, $500

• Mountainside at SilverCreek C U 88 Timeshare 088641 – Paul and Gloria Silbernagel to Mountainside SilverCreek Timeshare Association, $500

• Shores of Shadow Mountain FP Lot 11 – Wayne Neitz and Nancy Nemitz to Dwight and Maureen Friedley, $2,497,000

• Granby Ranch Filing 10, Lot 9 – Mark, Angela and Angie Breen to Craig Witte and Ann Abplanalp, $165,000