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Commissioners approve mobile concrete plant permit

Conditions must be met before operations can begin

This aerial image shows the proposed location of the Cornerstone Holdings concrete batch plant. Grand County commissioners approved a special use permit for the operation on Aug. 17 with a number of conditions.
Grand County commissioners’ packet

The county commissioners have approved a special use permit for the mobile concrete batch plant near Colorado Adventure Park.

Before Cornerstone Holdings’ proposed plant will be issued the special use permit, however, developer Clark Lipscomb will need to meet 14 conditions addressing a number of concerns. The permit, approved unanimously by commissioners on Aug. 17, will also have to be renewed in a year.

Water use was discussed over several meetings during the hearing for this special use permit, with commissioners stressing that the concrete plant would need to ensure that its water use would be legal. There is some debate over the water Lipscomb hopes to use, but commissioners said that the condition would be met as long as the applicant provides proof of water with approval by the state.



Lipscomb added that as an alternative he could truck the water in from a different pond where the industrial use of water is permitted, but he said he was trying to avoid that if possible. The permit does account for those extra truck trips, with a total of 81 daily trips allowed Monday through Saturday.

The concrete plant will be required to keep track of truck trips and submit the numbers to the county monthly, according to the conditions discussed. The trucks are prohibited from turning left out of the site, avoiding travel through Fraser, unless there is a specific concrete job in that direction.



While Lipscomb had requested a five-year permit, commissioners followed the recommendation of staff to issue it for one year instead so that unforeseen impacts could be addressed with renewal.

Lipscomb repeatedly emphasized that the plant, which is mobile and smaller than a typical concrete plant, would likely not operate past the five-year mark. However, he opposed adding a sunset date to the permit conditions.

There were some discussions about the visibility of the concrete plant, which Lipscomb explained could not be entirely blocked. Instead, the condition was revised to ensure that the existing berm on site would continue to buffer the view, though not entirely block.

Lipsomb will have to address the concerns outlined by Fraser’s town board, as the town owns the road that the concrete plant will use to transport material. One concern highlighted by Fraser was that of connectivity and safe access for bikers and pedestrians along the road.

While not part of the finalized conditions, Lipscomb did make a commitment to help with trails and connectivity as needed.

Commissioner Rich Cimino worried that the conditional use permit might not be doing enough to protect the public, especially related to pedestrian and bike traffic near the site, but saw the positives as well.

“I see some benefits of this concrete plant,” Cimino said. “I think with the construction demands of this county this will be a benefit, even if it only supplies to the Grand Park development or this developer’s projects.”

Before the permit is issued, staff will review the water management plan and ensure the applicant has met all conditions. Once conditions are met, the resolution for the special use permit will be brought to county commissioners for signatures.

While commissioners unanimously approved the special use permit pending review, Cimino warned he may not sign the resolution if he finds it’s not sufficient.


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