Granby author named to state Hall of Fame | SkyHiNews.com
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Granby author named to state Hall of Fame

Penny Rafferty Hamilton has been named to the Colorado Authors' Hall of Fame this year, with "Arcadia Images of America Around Granby" and "Absent Aviators: Gender Issues in Aviation" named as her books of note.
Courtesy Penny Rafferty Hamilton

Granby author and manager of the Emily Warner Field Aviation Museum Penny Rafferty Hamilton has been named one of this year’s inductees to the Colorado Authors’ Hall of Fame.

Hamilton is one of a dozen living authors from the state named to the Hall of Fame, as well as four legacy authors. She is honored for her three decades writing books and articles, including her recent works “America’s Amazing Airports,” “Inspiring Words for Sky and Space Women” and “101 Trailblazing Women of Air and Space.”

Findings from research Hamilton conducted on teaching women to fly has been published in the “Proceedings of the Human Resource Development International” and “Absent Aviators: Gender Issues in Aviation.”



In addition to being an author, Hamilton teaches about women in aviation at local schools, mentors women wanting to enter the STEM fields and runs Granby’s aviation museum. She has earned numerous journalism, education, business, and aviation awards.

Hamilton is also featured in Colorado’s Aviation and Women’s Hall of Fames.



The Colorado Authors’ Hall of Fame named “Arcadia Images of America Around Granby” and “Absent Aviators: Gender Issues in Aviation” Hamilton’s books of note.

 


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