Granby board talks short-term rental regs, development | SkyHiNews.com

Granby board talks short-term rental regs, development

Granby trustees broached the topic of short-term rentals Tuesday night during their regular meeting, seeking to get ahead of the issue.

The board directed Granby Town Manager Aaron Blair to formally review short-term rental regulations employed by other governmental entities in Grand County as well as those of other communities. The town plans to use that review process to develop its own short-term rental regulations for the community.

“I think we are behind the ball, not having addressed this,” said Natascha O’Flaherty, a town trustee. “It would behoove us to support the short-term rental market, as long as it is done in a way that is beneficial to our community in the long term.”

Granby Mayor Paul Chavoustie echoed her sentiments.

“We knew the conversation was being had,” Chavoustie said. “But I didn’t mind the fact that we were late to the party. We can see what is working and what is not. What is the balance between allowing people to do it but also being good neighbors and maybe not creating unfair competition for hotels?”

Blair said he will review regulations of other entities related to short-term rentals and will develop a draft regulatory framework that he plans to present before the end of the third quarter of 2018.

The board also dug into the town’s new infill development incentive program, meant to encourage development and new construction in the town’s central business corridor, stretching from Sixth Street to Mesa Street and from Agate Avenue to Jasper Avenue. The board approved the development incentive program Tuesday night.

Under the incentive program properties located within the central business district that meet certain criteria are eligible to receive a property tax refund for 10-year upon occupancy, a waiver of applicable use taxes and a rebate of $1 per square foot. The incentives are available for both new construction and redevelopment projects. Eligible projects must “result in new useable rental or living space” or must double the usable existing space to be considered for the program.

Towards the end of the evening town officials engaged in a somewhat heated discussion with Moffat Road Railroad Museum Director Dave Naples regarding water tap and sewer tap fees and a related certificate of occupancy the museum needed in order to open the Christmas Trains display later this year.

Discussion amongst Naples and the town board centered on the sewer and water tap fees that Naple’s contended were inappropriately levied on the Moffat Road Railroad Museum by the town. The town of Granby owns the land the museum occupies, just west of the baseball fields at Kaibab Park. The town has leased the land to the museum for 30 years at a rate of $10 per year.

Because the town owns the land, and because the museum is a nonprofit entity, Naples argued it was inappropriate for the town to require the museum to bear the costs of installing utilities on the property. Naples asserted those costs should be borne by the property owner. After a lengthy back and forth session, that included discussions about potentially selling the town owned land to the museum and pointed questions about the progress the museum has made over the last decade, the town approved a temporary certificate of occupancy that will allow the museum to operate their annual Christmas Trains display again this year, even in absence of the completion of water and sewer work.


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