Grand County news briefs | SkyHiNews.com

Grand County news briefs

The new crosswalk sign and signal push button in Granby is located at the corner of 4th Street and South 4th Street going across Agate Ave. The signs are solar powered and flashes as pedestrians cross the highway.
Lance Maggart / Sky-Hi News |

Colorado Headwaters Land Trust welcomes new executive director

The Grand County based Colorado Headwaters Land Trust has a new executive director.

Charles Curtin, formerly of Livingston, Montana, now resides in the Middle Park area. He started his position in mid-April.

Prior to moving to Grand County, Curtin worked with the University of Montana and local NGOs in that region to, “sustain ranching communities in large landscapes in Canada and the USA,” states a press release. The release goes on to state Curtin has helped establish collaborative conservation programs throughout his career including work at MIT and other universities.

Over the course of his career, Curtin has worked around the world on various projects. He has assisted in coordinating conservation and restoration projects in North America, East Africa and the Middle East.

“He helped develop a number of the largest conservation programs in North America,” states the release.

Curtin’s work includes, “the million-acre Malpai Borderlands Conservation Area, cross-site studies of climate change spanning the Intermountain West, and the 750,000 square-mile Downeast Initiative in the Western Atlantic off the coast of Main,” according to the release.

“Curtin is a clear fit for Grand County, as he brings two decades of experience in collaborative conservation in rural communities, including extensive experience in Colorado,” stated officials from the Land Trust. Officials from the Land Trust added Curtin has published more than 80 articles, books and monographs on conservation science.

The Colorado Headwaters Land Trust is made up of a small staff and a volunteer Board of Directors. The organization is state certified and nationally accredited. According to the Land Trust press release the Trust currently holds 63 conservation easements in Grand County, totaling 8,826 acres.

Sports

Panthers take tough loss to Bennett Tigers

The Middle Park High School baseball team took a tough loss Wednesday afternoon as they squared off against the Bennett High School Tigers.

The Panthers headed into the game fresh off of a three-game winning streak that saw them crush Moffat County, Arrupe Jesuit and KIPP Denver Collegiate by wide point margins. Unfortunately the boys from East Grand couldn’t maintain their momentum and stumbled in a decisive contest that saw the Tigers shutting out the Panthers.

The action got underway Wednesday afternoon in Bennett. The game had originally been scheduled as a home game for the Panther men but officials moved the contest to Bennett because of recent snowstorms in Middle Park. The Tigers struck early and put up four points in the top of the first and four more in the second. The Panther batters had no response on offense.

The Middle Park men prevented the Tigers from scoring any additional runs in the third inning and held them to one run in the top of the fourth. The fifth inning was the Panthers’ undoing though as the Tigers sent four more runners across home plate before East Grand could shut them down.

The bottom of the fifth was do or die for the Panthers, who needed at least four runs to stay alive and keep the game going into late innings. The Panther bats were cold Wednesday evening though and the boys were sent packing by the Tigers with a final score of 0-13.

It was a tough day at the plate for the Middle Park batters, with sophomore Aidan Roubidoux recording the team’s only hit for the game. It was also a tough day on the mound for the Panther pitchers, freshman James Gallegos and junior Kyger Mintken. The two boys threw a combined 110 pitches while giving up seven and nine hits respectively and five and eight runs respectively.

The Panther baseball boys had a Thursday afternoon game scheduled for Middle Park. That game took place after press-time for the Sky-Hi News. Look for results from that game, as well as a Saturday April 29 matchup in Sheridan, in the Wednesday May 3 edition of the Sky-Hi News.

Last weekend to grab turns at Winter Park Resort

Today is sad day in Middle Park for those who cherish winter sports.

The 2016/2017 winter ski season in Grand County draws to a close this weekend as Winter Park Resort prepares to host their final guests before the chairlifts stop turning late Sunday afternoon. The resort held their annual Springtopia and Spring Splash events last weekend as the culmination of the season. The Mary Jane Territory will remain open through Sunday April 30 though the remainder of the resort is now closed off.

Winter Park Resort is the last ski spot still open in Grand County this spring. Granby Ranch closed for the season at the beginning of the month on April 2. The various Nordic skiing facilities in Grand County, Snow Mountain Ranch, Devil’s Thumb Ranch and Grand Lake Nordic Center, all closed over the intervening weeks.

It has been a good season for Winter Park Resort, tallying more than 315 inches of snowfall from the start of the season through mid-week. “After looking at the forecast for this weekend that number is sure to go up,” stated Winter Park Resort spokesman Steve Hurlbert. “Possibly by quite a bit.”

According to Hurlbert, once Winter Park Resort shuts down this weekend the resort will have open a total of 159 days this season. Hurlbert pointed out the resort delayed their November opening slightly. “We got started a week late but extended the season by a week so it all ended up evening out,” he said.

Winter Park Resort opened for this winter ski season on November 23.

“With all the great snow we’ve enjoyed and all that was accomplished, we’re a little sad to see the 2016-17 ski season come to a close, but we couldn’t be happier with how things went,” stated Hurlbert. “From the return of the Winter Park Express to the greatest Springtopia celebration we’ve ever had, to the extended season at Mary Jane, it seemed like there was something exciting happening every day we were open.”

Hurlbert added the Resort is now shifting its focus and is preparing for the summer downhill biking season. Trestle Bike Park is scheduled to open for the summer on Saturday June 10.

Public safety

Pinwheels raise awareness for child abuse, neglect

Over the past few weeks you might have noticed a whimsical additional to the décor of the communities of Grand County as blue and silver Colorado pinwheels have been popping up in the store fronts, front yards and along sidewalks of Middle Park.

The pinwheels, called Pinwheels for Prevention, are part of a child abuse and neglect awareness campaign originally established by Grand Beginnings and Grand County Social Services. In 2014, the two entities began placing the eye-catching pinwheels at locations around Granby.

According to officials from Grand Beginnings, “the response by the town was so positive that the Chamber and local businesses began purchasing the pinwheels on their own.”

This year campaign organizers are expanding the scope of the project. The towns of Winter Park and Fraser have now joined in, “demonstrating how much of Grand County stands for the chance at the health, happy, and full lives that all children here deserve,” states a press release from Grand Beginnings.

“We all have an opportunity, as individuals and as community members, to work together to support Grand County’s most precious resource, our children,” states the press release. “Even for those who aren’t raising or working with children, there are proven ways for adults to help kids grow and maintain strong families.”

The release closes by listing resources citizens can call upon if they are concerned about the well being or safety of a child including: the Colorado Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline (1-844-264-5437). If you are interested in learning more about the Pinwheels for Prevention program contact Grand Beginnings by phone at 970-725-3391 or by email at vista@grandbeginnings.org.

Granby installs new crosswalk sign

The highways that run through Grand County are lifelines to the outside world.

But ask anyone who has had to cross one of our busy thoroughfares and they can tell you how potentially deadly these can be for those crossing on foot. Pedestrian crossings are a recurring safety concern in Middle Park. US Highway 40 runs through Winter Park, Fraser and Granby in areas that often see high pedestrian traffic numbers.

Last summer the Granby Board of Trustees voted approval for the purchase and installation of a new solar powered flashing crosswalk sign. The board’s action in mid-August approved a proposal brought before the Board by the Granby Design Committee.

The Granby Street Department installed the new crosswalk a few weeks ago in preparation for the coming summer tourist season. The new crosswalk is located on Agate Ave, also known as US 40, at the corner of 4th Street north of US 40, and South 4th Street south of the highway; essentially running between Mad Munches and Azteca.

According to officials from the Granby Street Department, the cost of the new crosswalk, including freight shipping to Granby, was invoiced at $4,464.22.

The design committee members who proposed the crosswalk took technical inspiration from the crosswalk setups used in Empire on the southern side of Berthoud Pass. At the time of approval last summer the Committee added they hoped to find funding to add more crosswalks at key points along Agate in Granby’s downtown district.

— Compiled from Sky-Hi News staff reports


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