It wasn’t just I-70 that suffered after Glenwood Canyon slides. The Colorado River took a blow, too. | SkyHiNews.com
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It wasn’t just I-70 that suffered after Glenwood Canyon slides. The Colorado River took a blow, too.

Michael Booth
Colorado Sun
A large mudslide from inside Blue Gulch spilled onto the Colorado River at mile post 123.5 on Friday, August 13, 2021, near Glenwood Springs. (Hugh Carey, The Colorado Sun)

When a mud and rock slide buried one of the more important highways in the West on July 29, the dramatic gridlock became a statewide spectator sport.

That same historic rock slide, at the same moment, blocked off the most important river in the West.

After decades of fierce arguments over damming up more of the water that rightfully belongs in the Colorado River, nature built a new dam in 5 minutes.



What happened to the fish? What happened to the river channel? What happened to drinking water downstream? Where did all the rafters go?

Collective emoji shrug?



It’s been a challenge getting any definitive answers to the temporary mud slaughter of the Colorado, as state disaster and highway officials rushed to open up I-70 as quickly as possible to restore commerce, tourism, and the Western Slope way of life. But now that a lane of the highway in each direction is open, and asphalt spreaders are on the job, some are turning their attention to the river that cut the canyon in the first place, and provides water and energy to seven states.

To continue reading, go to ColoradoSun.com.


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