Letters: Some Colorado counties are more equal than others; Does citizenship matter? | SkyHiNews.com

Letters: Some Colorado counties are more equal than others; Does citizenship matter?

Some Colorado counties are more equal than others

All states have equal representation in the U.S. Senate, regardless of size and population.

Only population determines the size of Colorado's senate districts, resulting in the imbalance of county representation, benefiting a few whole and divided counties.

A county is the state's sovereign, equivalent of a state of the United States. Therefore, the Colorado senate is merely Colorado's second house of representatives.

Rural counties might share in the benefits of state government if all counties had equal representation in reformed senate districts.

Chuck Olson, Evergreen

Does citizenship matter?

We've heard numerous emotional tales about the hardships and triumphs of illegal immigrants. Put the tissue box away. It is time to focus on the three most important questions of the immigration debate.

Does citizenship matter? American citizenship has value. It means you get to vote and choose our leaders, you can't be deported and it provides identity as an American. Some people are even proud to be an American, for the ideals, traditions and history. You might even call us patriotic. And no, kneeling for the national anthem is not patriotic. Harvard University wouldn't just give a degree to someone who snuck in to attend a class, so why would we give away citizenship? Simple answer is: we shouldn't, because citizenship matters.

Do Americans have a right to determine who comes and stays in this country? Of course we do. A major criteria should be based on what positive benefits an immigrant will bring to the country. Illegal immigration, by definition takes away the ability for us to decide who gets in, how many, what jobs they are doing and where they should go. Those here illegally who are demanding citizenship are essentially giving the middle finger to all Americans and those who came here legally by saying that they don't have to follow the law, and they don't have to wait in line. They want to be rewarded for immigrating the wrong way. Our country has no obligation to reward bad behavior. I can't understand the mindset of someone who knowingly and willingly breaks federal law and then turns around and demands citizenship. Try doing that in Russia or China. Our immigration policies should benefit American citizens, but too any politicians are putting the interests of foreigners above citizens.

Are there downsides to illegal immigration? Democrats love to tell us immigrant success stories. And those are real, but they never tell you about the costs. Take just the DACA immigrants, those who were brought here illegally as children. There are 800,000 in this category and the cost for public schools at $10,000 per year for an average of 10 years is $80 billion of taxpayer dollars spend on people who are not supposed to be here in the first place. Could that money have been used to improve our schools, roads or take care of the poor? Most illegal immigrants are poor with minimal education, so they are taking jobs away from poor and working class Americans and legal immigrants. I'm not saying they are bad people, but let's not kid ourselves and think that a flood of illegal immigration is somehow making this country richer. Liberals seem to always forget about that. So it makes you wonder, whose interests are politicians really looking after?

John DiGirolamo, Granby