Grand County, get ready to run, part III | SkyHiNews.com

Grand County, get ready to run, part III

Jackie Wright/The Fitness Trail

The first three-weeks of a nine-week beginner running training program was outlined in last week’s column. This week, the next segment of the program will be covered.

Each three-week segment is specifically designed to gradually increase the duration of the running component of the program, to enable the beginning runner to ease into a training regimen.

Be patient and avoid jumping the gun by increasing the duration or intensity of the running segments too soon, even if you feel great that day and want to push harder. This program is absolutely successful with my clients that follow the progression carefully.

Week Four

– Walk for five to 10 minutes to warm up the body.

– Fitness walk* for one minute followed by three minutes of slow to moderate-paced running and repeat this sequence 10 times ” Monday/Wednesday and Friday/Saturday.

– Fitness walk* for 30-35 minutes – Tuesday/Thursday

– Rest ” Sunday

Week Five

– Walk for five to 10 minutes to warm up the body.

– Fitness walk* for one minute followed by four minutes of slow to moderate-paced running and repeat this sequence nine times ” Monday/Wednesday and Friday/Saturday.

– Fitness walk* for 35-40 minutes ” Tuesday/Thursday

– Rest – Sunday

Week Six

– Walk for five to 10 minutes to warm up the body.

– Fitness walk* for one minute followed by five minutes of slow to moderate-paced running and repeat this sequence eight times ” Monday/Wednesday and Friday/Saturday.

– Fitness walk* for 35-40 minutes ” Tuesday/Thursday

– Rest – Sunday

*Fitness Walking refers to walking with purpose, not the pace of the warm-up walk.

Muscular Strength Training Program for Beginning Runners

Once you have committed to this nine-week beginner running training program and have successfully completed the first four to six weeks, it is time to begin incorporating consistent muscular strength training into your workout regimen.

Muscular strength training should be performed two to three times per week for all major muscle groups of the body. This should include two to three sets of 8-12 repetitions of 10 to 12 exercises that will address those muscles and muscle groups.

Allow 24-48 hours between muscular strength training sessions if you are performing a total body program. You may also choose to work the upper body one day and the lower the next, which is an effective alternative as one part of the body rests while the other works.

Below is a list of the muscle groups which should be included in a comprehensive muscular strength training program:

– Pectoralis (chest)

– Trapezius (upper/mid-back)

– Latissimus Dorsi (lower/lateral back)

– Gluteus Maximus (buttocks/hips)

– Abductors (outer-upper hip)

– Adductors (inner thighs)

– Gastrocnemius and Soleus (calves)

– Tibialis Anterior (shins)

– Quadriceps (anterior thigh)

– Hamstrings (posterior thigh)

– Deltoids (anterior, medial and posterior shoulder)

– Biceps (upper arm-anterior)

– Triceps (upper arm-posterior)

– Abdominals (outer-core unit-rectus abdominis, external/internal obliques)

– Inner Core Unit (transverses abdominis, multifidus and pelvic floor muscles)

– Erector Spinae (erector muscles of the spine)

Keep in mind that muscular strength training exercises should include both isolation work that focuses upon a particular muscle or muscle group, and those that concentrate on functional training, which includes several muscles or muscle groups working simultaneously.

Next week, look for the final three-week beginner running training program installment and two muscular strength training exercises as well as an excellent flexibility exercise all runners should perform after every running session.

” Jackie Wright can be reached at her e-mail address: gllacs@comcast.net.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.