The art of the hunt: Locals share photos from hunting season | SkyHiNews.com

The art of the hunt: Locals share photos from hunting season

Sky-Hi News
news@skyhinews.com
Justin and Jace, Granby

For centuries, hunting has been an integral part of Colorado’s outdoor heritage.

For a variety of reasons, there will always be those who choose to hunt and those who choose not to hunt. And that’s OK. However, whether you are a vegetarian, or simply someone who can’t imagine getting your meat from anywhere other than your local supermarket, it’s important to understand the critical role hunting plays in conservation, wildlife management and the many ways it benefits the state.

Some of those benefits include, as explained by Jerry Neal, a media specialist for Colorado Parks and Wildlife:

Supporting all of the state’s wildlife species: Because Colorado Parks and Wildlife does not receive general tax dollars to fund its wildlife management programs, these projects are paid for almost exclusively by sportsmen.

Benefitting local and state economies: Hunting and fishing contribute more than $2.8 billion in economic activity, rivaling the ski industry in total revenue generated.

Manages wildlife populations: In simple terms, hunters manage elk, deer, moose, sheep and goat populations to ensure that herds do not grow beyond the carrying capacity of the habitat.

It’s ethical and humane: Whether an animal is taken by a rifle, bow or muzzleloader, a hunter’s well-placed shot is far more humane than most of nature’s perils.

All game animals harvested by hunters are consumed: Hunting is often misrepresented solely as a quest for a trophy. But there is no trophy hunting in Colorado. Under Colorado law, every game species that is harvested by a hunter must also be processed and consumed.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.