Zoomer Boomer: A little tweak for what ails ya | SkyHiNews.com

Zoomer Boomer: A little tweak for what ails ya

John Riddell
Zoomer Boomer

John Ridell writes a business column and a fun, Zoomer-Boomer outdoor column for the Sky-Hi News.

Zoomer Boomers have a lot in common with old cars, old bicycles, and old snow blowers. All need a little mechanical tweaking every once in a while. With a car, a bicycle, or a snow blower, do-it- yourselfers grab a wrench, a little oil, maybe a screwdriver, apply the proper amount of force at the proper place, hold their mouth just right, and, lo and behold, squeaks are eliminated, creaks disappear, and the darn thing just seems to run better. Zoomer Boomers in need of such adjustment are advised to pursue a different course, but the results can be equally satisfying.

Whether new to a more active life style or being a lifelong proponent, aging magnifies and intensifies previously considered minor discomforts. Muscles no longer have quite the same flexibility, ligaments start to feel like old rope, and joints seem to have a voice of their own. While diet and exercise can certainly have a positive impact on inconveniences such as arthritis, years of repeating a same motion is not easily corrected.

Enter the world of the deep massage therapist. For the price of a good dinner, a well trained deep massage therapist can open up channels of flexibility that might have previously been relegated to the world of fond memories. Through direct pressure with controlled direction, old rope-like sinews can be brought back into alignment, kneaded into a preferred position, or just stretched out a wee bit. The result is a noticeable increase in personal suppleness and a general better feeling.

Now it is important to note that this deep massage process is not a skin tantalizing topical sensation. This is not the world of Ben-Gay magic. Rather, this is a massage activity that can only be appropriately implemented by someone with the training in the method as well as the strength to do it. Professionals are schooled in related subjects such as kinesiology and view their therapy in a very comprehensive perspective. As a result, sessions usually require an appointment and the commitment of at least an hour.

To say that such an hour's commitment is worth the cost would be an understatement. Having endured years of misalignment discomfort due to cheap knees perfectly matched with hard-headedness, no one hour session could ever provide an instant solution. But it definitely did provide an instant improvement. I simply felt better after the massage. Anecdotally, each time always resulted in a perception of better, more comfortable weekend warrior performance. But to be truly effective and to bring about lasting improvement, the massage has to been a part of an ongoing process that includes a routine of daily stretching that complements the schedule of massages.

If we Zoomers are nothing, we at least like to profess that we are open to new and better ways and ideas. Of course, self-delusion can be a dangerous trait. As a former scoffer of massages, I now stand corrected. Do yourself a favor, give it a try, and see if a little tweak isn't good for what ails you. And if this doesn't help—well, there is a reason God created single-malted Scotch.

Merry Christmas!

Following a successful international business career, John Riddell turned his attention to small business/entrepreneurial pursuits that included corporate turn-arounds, start-ups, teaching as an adjunct business school professor, authoring award winning business and sports columns, and serving as VP for the Chattanooga Chamber of Commerce directing its Center for Entrepreneurial Growth.